To keep up to date with all the news, join Tony on his new Fan Page or his Facebook Personal Page   

My World Walk .com

What Causes Cancer?

Cancer is a complex group of diseases with many possible causes. In this section you can learn more about the known and possible causes of cancer, as well as general information about carcinogens and how genetics play a role in cancer.

To Find Out More Click Here

Sources of Information



 Understanding Cancer...​What is cancer ?


A Collection of Related Diseases

Cancer is the name given to a collection of related diseases. In all types of cancer, some of the body’s cells begin to divide without stopping and spread into surrounding tissues.

Cancer can start almost anywhere in the human body, which is made up of trillions of cells. Normally, human cells grow and divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells grow old or become damaged, they die, and new cells take their place.

When cancer develops, however, this orderly process breaks down. As cells become more and more abnormal, old or damaged cells survive when they should die, and new cells form when they are not needed. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form growths called tumors.

Many cancers form solid tumors, which are masses of tissue. Cancers of the blood, such as leukemias, generally do not form solid tumors.

Cancerous tumors are malignant, which means they can spread into, or invade, nearby tissues. In addition, as these tumors grow, some cancer cells can break off and travel to distant places in the body through the blood or the lymph system and form new tumors far from the original tumor.

Unlike malignant tumors, benign tumors do not spread into, or invade, nearby tissues. Benign tumors can sometimes be quite large, however. When removed, they usually don’t grow back, whereas malignant tumors sometimes do. Unlike most benign tumors elsewhere in the body, benign brain tumors can be life threatening.

Differences between Cancer Cells and Normal Cells

Cancer cells differ from normal cells in many ways that allow them to grow out of control and become invasive. One important difference is that cancer cells are less specialized than normal cells. That is, whereas normal cells mature into very distinct cell types with specific functions, cancer cells do not. This is one reason that, unlike normal cells, cancer cells continue to divide without stopping. 
To Continue Reading Click Here

Living with cancer

This information is for people with cancer and their families and friends. It's about the feelings and experiences people have when they're diagnosed and treated for cancer, and while recovering from cancer treatment. 
Continue Reading Here



Cancer Types


Learn More About Cancer Types :  https://www.cancer.gov/types

There are more than 100 types of cancer. Types of cancer are usually named for the organs or tissues where the cancers form, but they also may be described by the type of cell that formed them. Learn more about cancer and types of cancer.
Click Here 

A

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)
Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)
Adolescents, Cancer in
Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Childhood Adrenocortical Carcinoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

AIDS-Related Cancers

Kaposi Sarcoma (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)
AIDS-Related Lymphoma (Lymphoma)
Primary CNS Lymphoma (Lymphoma)

Anal Cancer
Appendix Cancer - see Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors
Astrocytomas, Childhood (Brain Cancer)
Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor, Childhood, Central Nervous System (Brain Cancer)

B

Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin - see Skin Cancer
Bile Duct Cancer
Bladder Cancer

Childhood Bladder Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Bone Cancer (includes Ewing Sarcoma and Osteosarcoma and Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma)
Brain Tumors
Breast Cancer

Childhood Breast Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Bronchial Tumors, Childhood - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Burkitt Lymphoma - see Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

C

Carcinoid Tumor (Gastrointestinal)

Childhood Carcinoid Tumors - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Carcinoma of Unknown Primary

Childhood Carcinoma of Unknown Primary - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Cardiac (Heart) Tumors, Childhood - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Central Nervous System

Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor, Childhood (Brain Cancer)
Embryonal Tumors, Childhood (Brain Cancer)
Germ Cell Tumor, Childhood (Brain Cancer)
Primary CNS Lymphoma

Cervical Cancer

Childhood Cervical Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Childhood Cancers
Cancers of Childhood, Unusual
Cholangiocarcinoma - see Bile Duct Cancer
Chordoma, Childhood - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)
Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)
Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms
Colorectal Cancer

Childhood Colorectal Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Craniopharyngioma, Childhood (Brain Cancer)
Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma - see Lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome)

D

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) - see Breast Cancer

E

Embryonal Tumors, Central Nervous System, Childhood (Brain Cancer)
Endometrial Cancer (Uterine Cancer)
Ependymoma, Childhood (Brain Cancer)
Esophageal Cancer

Childhood Esophageal Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Esthesioneuroblastoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Ewing Sarcoma (Bone Cancer)
Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor, Childhood
Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor
Eye Cancer

Childhood Intraocular Melanoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Intraocular Melanoma
Retinoblastoma

F

Fallopian Tube Cancer
Fibrous Histiocytoma of Bone, Malignant, and Osteosarcoma

G

Gallbladder Cancer
Gastric (Stomach) Cancer

Childhood Gastric (Stomach) Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor
Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

Childhood Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Germ Cell Tumors

Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors (Brain Cancer)
Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors
Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors
Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors
Testicular Cancer

Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

H

Hairy Cell Leukemia
Head and Neck Cancer

Childhood Head and Neck Cancers - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Heart Tumors, Childhood - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Hepatocellular (Liver) Cancer
Histiocytosis, Langerhans Cell
Hodgkin Lymphoma
Hypopharyngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

I

Intraocular Melanoma

Childhood Intraocular Melanoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Islet Cell Tumors, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

K

Kaposi Sarcoma (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)
Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

L

Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis
Laryngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

Childhood Laryngeal Cancer and Papillomatosis - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Leukemia
Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)
Liver Cancer
Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell and Small Cell)

Childhood Lung Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Lymphoma

M

Male Breast Cancer
Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma of Bone and Osteosarcoma
Melanoma

Childhood Melanoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Melanoma, Intraocular (Eye)

Childhood Intraocular Melanoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Merkel Cell Carcinoma (Skin Cancer)
Mesothelioma, Malignant

Childhood Mesothelioma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Metastatic Cancer
Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary (Head and Neck Cancer)
Midline Tract Carcinoma Involving NUT Gene - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Mouth Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)
Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Multiple Myeloma/Plasma Cell Neoplasms
Mycosis Fungoides (Lymphoma)
Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms
Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic (CML)
Myeloid Leukemia, Acute (AML)
Myeloproliferative Neoplasms, Chronic

N

Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)
Nasopharyngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

Childhood Nasopharyngeal Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Neuroblastoma
Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

O

Oral Cancer, Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer and Oropharyngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

Childhood Oral Cavity Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Osteosarcoma and Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma of Bone
Ovarian Cancer

Childhood Ovarian Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

P

Pancreatic Cancer

Childhood Pancreatic Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)
Papillomatosis - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Paraganglioma

Childhood Paraganglioma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)
Parathyroid Cancer
Penile Cancer
Pharyngeal Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)
Pheochromocytoma

Childhood Pheochromocytoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Pituitary Tumor
Plasma Cell Neoplasm/Multiple Myeloma
Pleuropulmonary Blastoma - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Pregnancy and Breast Cancer
Primary Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma
Primary Peritoneal Cancer
Prostate Cancer

R

Rectal Cancer
Recurrent Cancer
Renal Cell (Kidney) Cancer
Retinoblastoma
Rhabdomyosarcoma, Childhood (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

S

Salivary Gland Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

Childhood Salivary Gland Tumors - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Sarcoma

Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)
Childhood Vascular Tumors (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)
Ewing Sarcoma (Bone Cancer)
Kaposi Sarcoma (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)
Osteosarcoma (Bone Cancer)
Uterine Sarcoma

Sézary Syndrome (Lymphoma)
Skin Cancer

Childhood Skin Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Small Cell Lung Cancer
Small Intestine Cancer
Soft Tissue Sarcoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin - see Skin Cancer
Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary, Metastatic (Head and Neck Cancer)
Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

Childhood Stomach (Gastric) Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

T

T-Cell Lymphoma, Cutaneous - see Lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides and Sèzary Syndrome)
Testicular Cancer

Childhood Testicular Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Throat Cancer (Head and Neck Cancer)

Nasopharyngeal Cancer
Oropharyngeal Cancer
Hypopharyngeal Cancer

Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma
Thyroid Cancer

Childhood Thyroid Tumors - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter (Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer)

U

Unknown Primary, Carcinoma of

Childhood Cancer of Unknown Primary - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Unusual Cancers of Childhood
Ureter and Renal Pelvis, Transitional Cell Cancer (Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer
Urethral Cancer
Uterine Cancer, Endometrial
Uterine Sarcoma

V

Vaginal Cancer

Childhood Vaginal Cancer - see Unusual Cancers of Childhood

Vascular Tumors (Soft Tissue Sarcoma)
Vulvar Cancer

W

Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

Y

Young Adults, Cancer in​

Signs and Symptoms of Cancer.


What are signs and symptoms?


Signs and symptoms are both signals of injury, illness, disease – signals that something is not right in the body.

A sign is a signal that can be seen by someone else – maybe a loved one, or a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional. For example, fever, fast breathing, and abnormal lung sounds heard through a stethoscope may be signs of pneumonia.

A symptom is a signal that’s felt or noticed by the person who has it, but may not be easily seen by anyone else. For example, weakness, aching, and feeling short of breath may be symptoms of pneumonia.

Having one sign or symptom may not be enough to figure out what’s causing it. For example, a rash in a child could be a sign of a number of things, such as poison ivy, measles, a skin infection, or a food allergy. But if the child has the rash along with other signs and symptoms like a high fever, chills, achiness, and a sore throat, then a doctor can get a better picture of the illness. Sometimes, a patient’s signs and symptoms still don’t give the doctor enough clues to be sure what’s causing the illness. Then medical tests, such as x-rays, blood tests, or a biopsy may be needed.

How does cancer cause signs and symptoms?

Cancer is a group of diseases that can cause almost any sign or symptom. The signs and symptoms will depend on where the cancer is, how big it is, and how much it affects the organs or tissues. If a cancer has spread (metastasized), signs or symptoms may appear in different parts of the body.

As a cancer grows, it can begin to push on nearby organs, blood vessels, and nerves. This pressure causes some of the signs and symptoms of cancer. If the cancer is in a critical area, such as certain parts of the brain, even the smallest tumor can cause symptoms.

But sometimes cancer starts in places where... 
To Continue Reading This Article Click Here

"Life is precious - Early cancer screening saves lives. So far on this walk four people told me they went for screening and 'nasty things were discovered ' That my friends is my fuel, the octane that drives me around the world as I have known many people who did not have the luxury of early detection."  Tony Mangan 10/2017